Thai Translation Services

Boost your brand value in Thailand by delivering engaging and relevant customer experiences across all media channels

Scroll down

Thai Localization

Performing Thai localization can be a tricky business. A complex non-Latin character set with tone marks, multiple registers for differing social context, significant text expansion when translating from English into Thai, determining whether technical terminology should be translated or transliterated – these are just some of the aspects that need to be considered in order to ensure that your business connects with its target audience effectively. In addition, the lack of spacing between Thai words inevitably causes issues with line breaking during desktop publishing, meaning that it is essential to work with Thai-native DTP operators. Therefore, selecting an experienced Thai localization partner is crucial if you want to get your projects done correctly on the first pass.

Getting Thai localization right

With one of its 80 person localization production centers located in central Bangkok, over the past two decades EQHO has helped corporations of all sizes all around the world to expand into new and challenging Asian markets, including Thailand. We have helped multinational companies like Microsoft, Siemens, P&G and Nestle achieve results by providing a combination of high quality Thai translation, scalability, and impeccable customer support, at superb value for money. EQHO has accumulated a proven track-record of helping companies engage with their customers and employees across Thailand.

  • We help companies engage with customers across multiple platforms and languages through high-quality localized content
    Siemens high-speed Airport Rail Link (ARL) – a race against time.
    Read case study…
  • Boost your brand value globally by delivering engaging and relevant customer experiences locally
    Taking BP Regionally, Then Globally
    Read the case study…
  • Thai language services

    • Translation

    • Editing

    • Proofreading

    • Machine Translation engine building

    • Machine translation post-editing

    • Desktop publishing

    • Voiceover & dubbing

    • Subtitling & closed captions

    • Flash & multimedia localization

    • Linguistic testing

    • Functional testing

    • Interpretation

    Products

    • Documentation

    • Technical manuals

    • Marketing materials

    • Brochures & flyers

    • Packaging & labeling

    • Magazines & newsletters

    • Websites

    • Mobile applications

    • Software applications

    • Training & eLearning

    • Voiceover & multimedia

    • Video content

    Localization 101

    New to localization?

    Download our free comprehensive 20 page Localization 101 guide

    Download

      

    About Thai

    About Thai

    The Thai language is now generally considered to be a member of the Tai group of the Tai-Kadai language family, although in China it is still classified as a member of the Sino-Tibetan language family. Other significant members of Tai group include Thai, Shan, and Zhuang; of these, Thai is most closely related to Thai, and for the most part, the two languages are mutually intelligible.

    Tradition holds that the initial form of the Thai script was created in 1283 A.D. by King Ramkhamhaeng, who modeled it on the Old Khmer script. The script was modified in 1357 A.D. during the reign of King Li Thai, and again in 1680 during the reign of King Narai. The latter modification is still in use today. The character set is not actually an alphabet, but rather an abugida – a writing system in which the consonants may include a vowel sound which is not explicitly written.

    The Thai script comprises 44 consonants, 2 of which are obsolete; 19 distinct vowel glyphs, which are used both individually and in combination with other vowel glyphs and certain consonants to form more than 60 vowels, diphthongs, and triphthongs; 4 tone markers, and a number of other glyphs which affect pronunciation or indicate duplication or abbreviation. Although Western numerals are now in common use, Thai numerals continue to be used in formal writing. Thai is written from left to right with no spaces between words; spaces are used primarily to separate clauses, sentences, and items in lists. Although Thai has no punctuation marks per se, periods are used to indicate abbreviations and ? and ! are now occasionally used in advertising and marketing copy.

    Consonants

    Vowel Glyphs*

    Tone Markers*

    Other Glyphs*

    Numerals

    * For technical reasons, in order to ensure that vowel glyphs, tone markers, and other diacritical glyphs are displayed correctly in all browsers, they are shown as paired with the consonant .  (The 4 vowel glyphs which are only used in Pali and Sanskrit loan words are shown independently.)

    Thai Translation & Localization Challenges

    
Thai Translation & Localization Challenges

    • Due to the absence of spaces between words, line-breaking cannot be performed properly by a non-native DTP operator. In addition, many DTP programs cannot properly support the multi-level positioning of vowels and tone markers.

    • The Thai language has multiple registers; i.e., different vocabulary is used depending on the situation and social context, as well as on the age, sex, and status of the speaker / writer and the listener / reader. There are four major registers – royal, ecclesiastical, written, and spoken – with written and spoken each having multiple sub-registers.

    • Technical and scientific terms are often transliterated rather than translated, but there are few reference materials that define the “standard” spellings of such transliterations.

    • Thai has a very rich system of grammatical aspect; i.e., elaboration of the manner in which an event transpires and progresses over time. This can result in considerable text expansion / contraction when translating from / to Thai.

    Millions of people around the world are using products localized by EQHO

    Contact us to see how you can take your product global

    Contact us

    Contact Us